Battery Defense Attorney

If you have been charge with any kind of battery, contact Indianapolis criminal defense attorney Randall Parr today.

There are  many different types of battery crimes in Indiana.  Battery in Indiana is defined in the Indiana Code as:

(c) Except as provided in subsections (d) through (k), a person who knowingly or intentionally:

(1) touches another person in a rude, insolent, or angry manner; or

(2) in a rude, insolent, or angry manner places any bodily fluid or waste on another person;

commits battery, a Class B misdemeanor.

(d) The offense described in subsection (c)(1) or (c)(2) is a Class A misdemeanor if it:

(1) results in bodily injury to any other person; or

(2) is committed against a member of a foster family home (as defined in IC 35-31.5-2-139.3) by a person who is not a resident of the foster family home if the person who committed the offense is a relative of a person who lived in the foster family home at the time of the offense.

(e) The offense described in subsection (c)(1) or (c)(2) is a Level 6 felony if one (1) or more of the following apply:

(1) The offense results in moderate bodily injury to any other person.

(2) The offense is committed against a public safety official while the official is engaged in the official’s official duty.

(3) The offense is committed against a person less than fourteen (14) years of age and is committed by a person at least eighteen (18) years of age.

(4) The offense is committed against a person of any age who has a mental or physical disability and is committed by a person having the care of the person with the mental or physical disability, whether the care is assumed voluntarily or because of a legal obligation.

(5) The offense is committed against an endangered adult (as defined in IC 12-10-3-2).

(6) The offense:

(A) is committed against a member of a foster family home (as defined in IC 35-31.5-2-139.3) by a person who is not a resident of the foster family home if the person who committed the offense is a relative of a person who lived in the foster family home at the time of the offense; and

(B) results in bodily injury to the member of the foster family.

(f) The offense described in subsection (c)(2) is a Level 6 felony if the person knew or recklessly failed to know that the bodily fluid or waste placed on another person was infected with hepatitis, tuberculosis, or human immunodeficiency virus.

(g) The offense described in subsection (c)(1) or (c)(2) is a Level 5 felony if one (1) or more of the following apply:

(1) The offense results in serious bodily injury to another person.

(2) The offense is committed with a deadly weapon.

(3) The offense results in bodily injury to a pregnant woman if the person knew of the pregnancy.

(4) The person has a previous conviction for a battery offense:

(A) included in this chapter against the same victim; or

(B) against the same victim in any other jurisdiction, including a military court, in which the elements of the crime for which the conviction was entered are substantially similar to the elements of a battery offense included in this chapter.

(5) The offense results in bodily injury to one (1) or more of the following:

(A) A public safety official while the official is engaged in the official’s official duties.

(B) A person less than fourteen (14) years of age if the offense is committed by a person at least eighteen (18) years of age.

(C) A person who has a mental or physical disability if the offense is committed by an individual having care of the person with the disability, regardless of whether the care is assumed voluntarily or because of a legal obligation.

(D) An endangered adult (as defined in IC 12-10-3-2).

*See complete Indiana Code for full description of all crimes and statutes.  This is a partial listing only.